Embrace Forward Motion

Wellness, fitness & personal growth


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Preparing A Bike Emergency Kit

A normal bike ride can quickly turn into an instance of a flat tire, mechanical malfunction, or worse, an injury. Read here on the key tools and items to have in your Bike Emergency Kit:

Repair a Flat Tire

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A. Mini Pump – Not all that useful for inflating a whole tire, but good for shaping new tube for easier insertion back into wheel. Usually can be attached to the bike frame.

B. Spare Tube – Find the size and valve needed for your bike. (Little advice: keep in box to prevent accidental puncture from the other tools in the bag.)

C. Tire Levers – Use these to open up tire to remove tube, and later for getting the tire back on properly.

D. Tube Patch Kit – Sometimes a patch will do the trick on a punctured tube! May come with extra glue or as stickers.

E. CO2 Inflators – Now these will get your repaired tire back to full PSI riding condition! Use if you’re stranded on the road; if at home, save these and use floor pump instead.

Mechanical Adjustments

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F. Allen Tool – These will adjust most, if not all, your bolts and screws on your bike.

G. Swiss Army Knife – Mini screwdriver, a blade, and a few other tools. May come in handy for a variety of needs!

Medical and First-Aid

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H. First-Aid Kit – May include Band-Aids of different sizes, gauze, insect bite relief, alcohol wipes, hand-towelettes, and gloves.

I. Emergency Contacts and Assistance (not pictured) – Paper with your name, allergies, date of birth, as well as names and numbers of emergency contacts. May also carry health-insurance card and AAA Card. (Certain cities, like Minneapolis, offer bike road-side service to cyclists who are AAA members and are stranded.)

Storage and Closing Notes

Most often, bike emergency kits are carried in under-the-seat saddle bags, but may also be stored in backpacks or panniers. These can be purchased in a variety of sizes in local bike shops or online.

Always remember to carry a phone, identification, and money with you. Ride predictably and notify someone of your route if riding alone. Enjoy the ride!

Want to know what else to bring on your ride? Read up on the Essential Bike Accessories.

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Money-Saving Tips on New Gym Memberships

Embrace Forward Motion

Enrolling in a gym is like starting a relationship: you need one that you like, fulfills your needs and wants, fits your lifestyle, and will not suck all the money out of your pocket.

With that in mind, here are some money-saving tips on new gym memberships:

Initiation Fees and Membership Dues

  • Initiation fees are typically one-time payments, while membership dues are normally recurring.
  • Fitness clubs at times may offer six-month or one-year commitment discounted rates. Basically, you pay up front for a given period of time, at a lower price than the current monthly rate (if added for the length of the contract).
    • Don’t go for the long-term contract. If you have an injury, don’t like the gym, change address or end up not going as often you thought you would, you won’t be getting your money’s worth and you can’t get your money back.
    • Stick with monthly payments. Give yourself the luxury of being able to cancel if and when you need to.
    • Wait for a better time of year. If the best deal currently is the packaged offer, you are likely not getting the best deal possible.
    • Ideal Best Deal = Low (or $0) initiation fees, low monthly payments.
    • Realistic Best Deal = Special Offer initiation fee (maybe 50% off regular), and LOW monthly payments. 

Best times of Year

  • Fitness clubs will run special offers throughout the year. Popular times are summer months, right BEFORE the New Year and the end of each month. Most gyms must complete membership quotas and they cram offers at the end of the month or year if they haven’t met their sales requirements.

About Those Quotas…

  • Sales representatives (real or virtual) will approach you in with enrollment or retention in mind. Though neither is better than the other, this is what you can expect:
    • Enrollment: Most fitness clubs have sales representatives who must fulfill enrollment quotas. Simply put, sales reps must enroll X number of new members monthly, quarterly, annually, etc. If you expressed the faintest interest in joining, these people really want you to join their gym. They will call you, e-mail you, send you offers and leave messages. And then a week later they will do it again.
    • Retention: Selective fitness centers may have retention quotas instead. The sales representatives’ performance is determined by how many loyal members they keep for the long term. This means that if you are new and show the slightest indication that you may not be with them long term, they may even discourage you (in a nice way) from joining, or say that this fitness club may not be the best fit for your wellness goals.

Bargaining Tips

  • Ask people you know who are members how much they pay monthly. Use that as leverage with the sales rep for your own dues.
  • Compare prices with similar gyms and present the competition to the sales representative.

Extra Tips

  • Many gyms offer couple or family member discounts or account extensions with a low transfer/initiation fee. Ask about those if it applies.
  • Call your health insurance. Most will offer monthly reimbursements if you attend one of their selected gyms an X amount of days per month.
  • Don’t jump at the first offer. Thank the rep and say you’ll think about it. Afterwards, compare and bargain.
  • Find the best fit for the least amount of money. No more, no less!

Need help unscrambling the confusing world of gym membership amenities? Check out Gym-Shopping Stress Free: Factors to Consider.


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Gym Shopping Stress-Free: Factors to Consider

Gym

If it’s nearing that time of year when you’re thinking about joining a fitness club, or if you are interested in switching from your current one, it’s time to start gym shopping! First, figure out what you’re looking for.

Here are some membership benefits to consider when choosing the fitness club that best fits your needs:

Cost of Membership

  • Monthly membership dues can typically range anywhere from $25 to $120 a month. The more expensive a club is, the more expansive, clean and high-quality it will likely be. Watch out for initiation fees–certain clubs have fees as high as $200, though many provide special offers throughout the year with no, or lower, initiation fees. Cost will likely end up being one of your biggest factors when deciding.

Group Fitness Classes

  • Fitness classes are, in my opinion, awesome to keep you going, entertained and motivated through the winter. They are great for trying out new activities, developing skills and having fun with others. Every class will be different every time. Ask to see the weekly schedule of classes to figure out if the ones you are interested in match your availability. Small fitness clubs may have studios available with recorded on-demand workout videos, instead of on-site instructors.

Aquatics Facilities, Courts and Studios

  • Availability and quality of aquatic facilities, courts and studios may be a make-or-break deal for some people. Large complexes will have the widest variety. Don’t forget to check availability (and location) of saunas and steam rooms.

Professional Support

  • Need personal training, nutritional coaching or fitness assessments? Upscale large fitness clubs have a professional for every need and muscle group, medium-sized facilities have trainers for training sessions and floating on the fitness floor to answer questions, while small centers will typically just have trainers available when leading a personal training session. Seek places with the support you need.

Child Care

  • if you have kids and need someone to watch them while you work out, find a gym that offers on-site babysitting. It’ll be one less thing to worry about.

Location

  • Preferably find a fitness center that is close to home or work. The easier it is to get to, the more likely you’ll go. It’ll also save time commuting.

Hours

  • Maybe you need one of those 24-hour gyms, perhaps one that closes by 10 p.m. is good enough for you, or you may be in dire need of a fitness center open at 5 a.m.. Check schedules.

Now that you know what you’re looking for, start by:

  • Browsing online for gyms (and their benefits) in your area
  • Visiting a few locations
  • Asking the sales representatives lots of questions!

Remember you’re still shopping, so don’t get pressured by the sales! Check out how to find the best deals on fitness club memberships.


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DO’s and DON’T’s of Overcoming Injuries: A Personal Discovery

Injuries are unexpected and inconvenient. As a typical 20-something, I sometimes feel like I am invincible. Nevertheless, a recent injury put a halt to my duathlon training. I present to you DO’s and DON’Ts, which I’ve discovered during my recovery, of overcoming injuries, as well as a narrative… because who doesn’t love a good injury story?

Two weeks ago I was out on a training run. Diverting my attention to the side, I stepped where the sidewalk meets the grass. Ungracefully, I fell and sprained my ankle. As I watched my ankle swell up and felt pain in my arch, thoughts of “well, that was stupid” and “there goes my race” flooded in. First lessons:

  • DO watch where you’re going when running.
  • DON’T put yourself down. Recognize mistakes and move past them.

After limping back home a few blocks, I dug up my ankle brace (saved from a previous ankle sprain and foot fracture on my other foot) and RICE’d up my day– Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate. And of course, sadly canceled plans and sat at home at a loss of what to do.

  • DO RICE–Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate–the injured limb.
  • DO keep braces, crutches or other injury “accessories”– you may need them again.

A week went by. I used my ankle brace daily, and a crutch the first few days. After talking to trainers and runners, hearing a few “I-wish-I-would-have-taken-care-of-my-injury-when-it-happened-because-now-I’m-doomed-with-weak-joints” stories, and recognizing that I intend to continue running, I set up a visit with the podiatrist.

  • DO go see a doctor if the injury is not improving, getting worse, or you want to figure out what’s wrong exactly and treat the injury accordingly.

Doctor’s advice: Ankle ligaments will take six weeks to heal completely, and the plantar fasciitis should be relieved with stretching. Until then, no running, no biking, no race. Of course I tried to bargain on the biking, but she remained firm with her answer. After giving it some thought, I decided: I’m planning on keeping a well-working ankle for the next 70 years… relatively, six weeks is not that long.

  • DON’T rush your healing time. Cutting off recovery and rehab time will highly increase chances of reinjury.
  • DO think of your recovery time as an investment: one extra week now may translate to an extra year for your limb to properly work years down the road.
  • DO recognize your body has limits. Respect them.
  • DO be realistic about safely resetting goals.

If I had to pick my top two lessons from this experience, these are it:

  • DO stay positive.
  • DO embrace this time as an opportunity to explore new areas of personal growth and wellness.


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Best Urban Trails in Minneapolis and St. Paul

Summertime is great for exploring the outdoors! The Twin Cities are well known for their beautiful urban landscape, with an abundance of vitalizing parks, trails and bodies of water.

Here is my selection of the Best Trails in Minneapolis and St. Paul for every mood. If you are looking to be by…

The Lakes

  • Check out the Chain of Lakes. Among the lakes, Lake Calhoun is the biggest (and seemingly with the highest number of active people) in Minneapolis. Looking for something calmer? Explore Lake Harriet–family friendly, with shade under trees and lake views throughout. Rest by the Lake Harriet Bandshell for food, and free movies and music in the summer.

    Chain of Lakes

    Chain of Lakes

The Mississippi River

  • Go see West River Parkway (Minneapolis side)–beautiful stretches between Broadway St. and Plymouth Ave., and south of Lake St. to Minnehaha Falls Park.

    West River Parkway

    West River Parkway

  • Try Mississippi River Boulevard (St. Paul side). Enjoy scenic views of the river between Franklin Ave. and Summit Ave. Be sure to stop at the landscaped rest area where Summit Ave. meets the Boulevard for amazing panoramic views, a historic monument and hidden dirt trail and waterfalls down by the river.

    Mississippi River Boulevard

    Mississippi River Boulevard

A Residential Area

  • Go for a stroll on St. Anthony Parkway in Northeast Minneapolis. Suburban feel in an urban landscape. Winding off-road trail and sidewalk, plenty of green to catch your eye and quiet neighborhood. Make a stop at Deming Heights Park to reach the highest elevation in Minneapolis. (The St. Anthony Parkway bridge on the west end of the Parkway will be under construction from Aug. 2015 to summer of 2017; plan for an alternative connecting route if coming from the west.)

    St. Anthony Parkway

    St. Anthony Parkway

Minnehaha Creek

  • Run on the Minnehaha Parkway trails. A hidden urban escape with fluid, gentle water sounds. The tree canopy makes it easy to forget you are in the middle of the city. Great connecting route between Lake Harriet, Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Falls.

    Minnehaha Parkway

    Minnehaha Parkway

Open Prairie Fields

  • Ride on the Cedar Lake Trail. Parts of the trail accommodate pedestrians and cyclists with three separate parallel lanes, including one-way bike lanes in each direction. Fast commute. with ample sun and open space. Bring your own water supply in the summer; there are only a few water sources available. Connect with the Kenilworth Trail for a tree- and shade-filled oasis that leads to the Chain of Lakes.
Cedar Lake Trail

Cedar Lake Trail

Kenilworth Trail

Kenilworth Trail

The Middle of the City

  • Go on the Midtown Greenway. Although not very scenic, it gets you where you need to go. With many street exits in the middle of Minneapolis, the Greenway starts at W. River Pkwy., stretches past Lake Calhoun and merges with the Cedar Lake Trail.

    Midtown Greenway

    Midtown Greenway


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Strategies for Sparking Change in Physical Activity

Mississippi River Overlook

Change challenges us and helps us thrive, as individuals and as a community. Pursuing and maintaining a physically active lifestyle will allow us to be healthy, happy and productive people.

It’s easier to progress our personal growth when we have direction. The five Stages for Motivational Readiness for Change, as explained in my earlier post Making Physical Activity a Habit, guide individuals on creating lifelong habit changes in physical activity.

Here are strategies you can implement to move up the stages and spark change in your current levels of physical activity:

How to advance through the Stages of Change

1. Identify which stage you are in (for guidance, click here).

2. Read through and consider the following selection of recommendations from Motivating People to Be Physically Active (Forsyth & Marcus, 2003) on how to advance through the stages. Many of these are cumulative and continue to apply as you move up the stages; some are specific to the stage.

If you are in…

Stage 1 – Inactive and not thinking about becoming more active

  • Write down how your sedentary lifestyle is affecting you and your loved ones
  • Determine benefits of physical activity and how much these matter to you
  • Look back at past attempts at behavior change and identify learned experiences

Stage 2 – Inactive and thinking about becoming more active

  • Expand knowledge on benefits of physical activity
  • Identify excuses and issues that prevent you from engaging in physical activity
  • Create achievable short-term goals

Stage 3 – Doing some physical activity

  • Create a plan to substitute 15 minutes of sedentary time in the week with an simple, enjoyable, active option
  • Decide on a reward for achieving your goals
  • Brainstorm ways to overcome excuses that shy you away from physical activity

Stage 4 – Doing enough physical activity

  • Note how you have benefitted from physical activity
  • Think about future obstacles that may prevent you from engaging in physical activity and develop a plan on how to address them
  • Expand your horizons and try out new physical activities

Stage 5 – Making physical activity a habit (maintaining Stage 4 for at least 6 months)

  • Launch long-term goals and track progress on a log
  • Consider becoming a role model to someone who may need motivation to advance through any of the stages
  • Remind yourself that if for some reason you need to pause physical activity, you will be capable of resuming

Most importantly, always remember to praise yourself for your efforts, diligence and dedication. The only one who ultimately can enable your personal growth is you!


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Essential Bike Accessories

The spring weather is beautiful and it’s biking season! Here are some essential items and accesories that will ensure you have a smooth, comfortable and safe bike ride!

Need To Have

Bicycle – Most common types are road bikes (specialized for slick paved surfaces), mountain bikes (best for rugged terrain) and hybrid bikes (considered great commuter bikes).

Helmet – Safety first: protect your head, you only have one. Make sure the helmet fits right according to the instructions. IMPORTANT: Once a helmet has been in a crash, you MUST replace it. The material compresses only once (often not visibly) and it will no longer protect you in the future.

Lights – If you are going to do any riding during dark hours, you need a front white light and a back red light. Not only do they improve your visibility to drivers at night, but also they are required by law in many cities. Additionally, the front light will help you see where you are going and avoid potholes or rough bumps on the road.

U-Lock – Lock your bike whenever you make a stop and leave it unattended. U-Locks are harder to break than cables or chains. The better the lock, the less chance your bike will get stolen.

Nice To Have

Bike Emergency Kit – May include tools and items to repair a flat tire, make mechanical adjustments, and tend to minor medical needs and first-aid. Follow link for more information on what to pack.

Road ID – In case you become unconscious due to a collision or another circumstance, this handy wristband can list your name, city, emergency contacts and phone numbers, allergies or other critical information that may assist others (including EMTs) to help you when you are not able speak for yourself. You can get it for a good price in different colors and in different varieties (ankle bracelets, shoe attachments, etc.). Explore the RoadID website for more details.

Phone – For safety, in case you need to make emergency phone calls, and to track your route and progress. Fitness apps with GPS like Endomondo and MapMyRide can measure your speed, riding time, elevation, time splits, and map your route, among others. See Resources for more details.

Sports Watch – It’s nice to keep track of time in a visually accessible place.

Water Bottle – Stay hydrated during longer rides. Bottles can be mounted onto most frames for easy access while riding.

Gloves – Great for slightly chillier rides. There are also variety of sweat-wicking athletic gloves with good grip.

Windbreaker/Raincoat – Nice for the windy and rainy days.

Obviously there are a variety of other gadgets and accessories you can invest in depending on what kind of riding you do. Hope this list helps you get started on the basics; be sure to visit local bike shops or chat with cyclist friends for other useful accessory ideas!